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COVID-19 Resources

Communities for Immunity

This page includes a number of resources to equip, inspire, and inform the Richmond County community about programs and activities to advance vaccine confidence in the community. We will continue to add evidence-based resources from trusted sources as they are developed and made available by Communities for Immunity partners and collaborators.

Find COVID-19 Vaccine Clinics in Richmond County

Click on the map below to find COVID-19 vaccine clinics in Richmond County.

VACCINE LOCATOR

Transportation to Local Vaccine Clinics

If you or a family member are in need of transportation to a nearby vaccine clinic located in Richmond County dial 706-707-9500.

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COVID-19 Vaccine Resources for Children & Teens

Getting vaccinated provides an important layer of protection for your child, your family, and others. We know parents and caregivers have questions and want more information. Here’s what you need to know.

Children can still get very sick from COVID-19.

Children can get infected with COVID-19, get very sick, suffer short- and long-term health complications, and spread COVID-19 to others.

The COVID-19 vaccine is safe and effective for children ages 5 through 11 years.

COVID-19 vaccination has been studied carefully in children. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the expert panel that works with them have reviewed the data from clinical trials. They all agree that vaccination for children ages 5 through 11 years is safe and effective. Here are some important points they used to make their recommendations:

  • In clinical trials, vaccination was more than 90% effective in preventing COVID-19 in children ages 5 through 11 years.
  • Unlike many medications, COVID-19 vaccine dosage does not vary by patient weight but by age on the day of vaccination. Children ages 5 through 11 years get an age-appropriate dose that is the right amount that was found to best protect children in clinical trials.
  • The COVID-19 vaccine for children ages 5 through 11 years has the same active ingredients as the vaccine given to adults and adolescents. However, the vaccine that is given to adults and adolescents cannot be given to children.
  • The safety of COVID-19 vaccine continues to be monitored. This includes the risk of myocarditis and pericarditis in children ages 5 through 11 years. However, serious health events, including severe allergic reactions and myocarditis and pericarditis, after COVID-19 vaccination are rare.
  • The benefits of COVID-19 vaccination among children outweigh the known and potential risks.
  • Your child may get the COVID-19 vaccine and other vaccines, including the flu vaccine, at the same time.

Some side effects are normal signs the vaccine is working.

Your child may have some side effects. These are normal signs that their body is building protection. Some common side effects are

  • Pain, redness, or swelling on the arm
  • Tiredness
  • Headache
  • Muscle pain, chills, or fever
  • Nausea

Some children will have no side effects and severe allergic reactions are rare. If your child experiences a severe allergic reaction after getting a COVID-19 vaccine, we are ready to respond. Most of the time, the only things your child might need after vaccination is rest, a non-aspirin pain reliever, and a cool washcloth at the injection site. Contact us if you need more information about treating potential side effects.

After vaccination, you can create or use your account to enter your child’s information in v-safe. You can use this easy-to-use smartphone-based tool to report to CDC how your child is feeling after vaccination and will even remind you when your child is due for their second dose.

For Parents & Caregivers:

For Providers & Professionals:

For Schools:

 

Myths and Facts about COVID-19 Vaccines

MYTH: The ingredients in COVID-19 vaccines are dangerous.

FACT: Nearly all the ingredients in COVID-19 vaccines are also ingredients in many foods – fats, sugars, and salts.

Exact vaccine ingredients vary by manufacturer. Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines also contain messenger RNA (mRNA) and the Johnson & Johnson/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine contains a harmless version of a virus unrelated to the virus that causes COVID-19. These give instructions to cells in your body to create an immune response. This response helps protect you from getting sick with COVID-19 in the future. After the body produces an immune response, it discards all the vaccine ingredients just as it would discard any information that cells no longer need. This process is a part of normal body functioning.

COVID-19 vaccines do NOT contain ingredients like preservatives, tissues (like aborted fetal cells), antibiotics, food proteins, medicines, latex, or metals.

MYTH: The natural immunity I get from being sick with COVID-19 is better than the immunity I get from the COVID-19 vaccination.

FACT: Getting a COVID-19 vaccination is a safer and more dependable way to build immunity to COVID-19 than getting sick with COVID-19.

COVID-19 vaccination causes a more predictable immune response than infection with the virus that causes COVID-19. Getting a COVID-19 vaccine gives most people a high level of protection against COVID-19 and can provide added protection for people who already had COVID-19One study showed that, for people who already had COVID-19, those who do not get vaccinated after their recovery are more than 2 times as likely to get COVID-19 again than those who get fully vaccinated after their recovery.

All COVID-19 vaccines currently available in the United States are effective at preventing COVID-19. Getting sick with COVID-19 can offer some protection from future illness, sometimes called “natural immunity,” but the level of protection people get from having COVID-19 may vary depending on how mild or severe their illness was, the time since their infection, and their age.

Getting a COVID-19 vaccination is also a safer way to build protection than getting sick with COVID-19. COVID-19 vaccination helps protect you by creating an antibody response without you having to experience sickness. Getting vaccinated yourself may also protect people around you, particularly people at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19. Getting sick with COVID-19 can cause severe illness or death, and we can’t reliably predict who will have mild or severe illness. If you get sick, you can spread COVID-19 to others. You can also continue to have long-term health issues after COVID-19 infection.

Learn about why you should get vaccinated even if you already had COVID-19.

MYTH: COVID-19 vaccines cause variants.

FACT: COVID-19 vaccines do not create or cause variants of the virus that causes COVID-19. Instead, COVID-19 vaccines can help prevent new variants from emerging.

New variants of a virus happen because the virus that causes COVID-19 constantly changes through a natural ongoing process of mutation (change).  As the virus spreads, it has more opportunities to change. High vaccination coverage in a population reduces the spread of the virus and helps prevent new variants from emerging. CDC recommends that everyone 5 years of age and older get vaccinated as soon as possible.

Learn more about variants.

MYTH: All events reported to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) are caused by vaccination.

FACT: Anyone can report events to VAERS, even if it is not clear whether a vaccine caused the problem. Because of this, VAERS data alone cannot determine if the reported adverse event was caused by a COVID-19 vaccination.

Some VAERS reports may contain information that is incomplete, inaccurate, coincidental, or unverifiable. Vaccine safety experts study these adverse events and look for unusually high numbers of health problems, or a pattern of problems, after people receive a particular vaccine.

Recently, the number of deaths reported to VAERS following COVID-19 vaccination has been misinterpreted and misreported as if this number means deaths that were proven to be caused by vaccination. Reports of adverse events to VAERS following vaccination, including deaths, do not necessarily mean that a vaccine caused a health problem.

Learn more about VAERS.

MYTH: The mRNA vaccine is not considered a vaccine.

FACT: mRNA vaccines, such as Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna, work differently than other types of vaccines, but they still trigger an immune response inside your body.

This type of vaccine is new, but research and development on it has been underway for decades.

The mRNA vaccines do not contain any live virus. Instead, they work by teaching our cells to make a harmless piece of a “spike protein,” which is found on the surface of the virus that causes COVID-19. After making the protein piece, cells display it on their surface. Our immune system then recognizes that it does not belong there and responds to get rid of it. When an immune response begins, antibodies are produced, creating the same response that happens in a natural infection.

In contrast to mRNA vaccines, many other vaccines use a piece of, or weakened version of, the germ that the vaccine protects against. This is how the measles and flu vaccines work. When a weakened or small part of the virus is introduced to your body, you make antibodies to help protect against future infection.

Learn more about how mRNA COVID-19 vaccines work.

MYTH: COVID-19 vaccines contain microchips.

FACT: Receiving a COVID-19 vaccine will not make you magnetic, including at the site of vaccination which is usually your arm.

COVID-19 vaccines do not contain ingredients that can produce an electromagnetic field at the site of your injection. All COVID-19 vaccines are free from metals.

Learn more about the ingredients in the COVID-19 vaccinations authorized for use in the United States.

MYTH: COVID-19 vaccines authorized for use in the United States shed or release their components.

FACT: Vaccine shedding is the release or discharge of any of the vaccine components in or outside of the body and can only occur when a vaccine contains a live weakened version of the virus.

None of the vaccines authorized for use in the U.S. contain a live virus. mRNA and viral vector vaccines are the two types of currently authorized COVID-19 vaccines available.

Learn more about mRNA and​ viral vector COVID-19 vaccines.

MYTH: COVID-19 vaccines can alter my DNA.

FACT: COVID-19 vaccines do not change or interact with your DNA in any way.

Both messenger RNA (mRNA) and viral vector COVID-19 vaccines work by delivering instructions (genetic material) to our cells to start building protection against the virus that causes COVID-19.

After the body produces an immune response, it discards all the vaccine ingredients just as it would discard any information that cells no longer need. This process is a part of normal body functioning.

The genetic material delivered by mRNA vaccines never enters the nucleus of your cells, which is where your DNA is kept. Viral vector COVID-19 vaccines deliver genetic material to the cell nucleus to allow our cells to build protection against COVID-19. However, the vector virus does not have the machinery needed to integrate its genetic material into our DNA, so it cannot alter our DNA.

Learn more about how COVID-19 vaccines work.

MYTH: A COVID-19 vaccine can make me sick with COVID-19.

FACT: Because none of the authorized COVID-19 vaccines in the United States contain the live virus that causes COVID-19, the vaccine cannot make you sick with COVID-19.

COVID-19 vaccines teach our immune systems how to recognize and fight the virus that causes COVID-19. Sometimes this process can cause symptoms, such as fever. These symptoms are normal and are signs that the body is building protection against the virus that causes COVID-19.

Learn more about how COVID-19 vaccines work

 

Resources from this page were provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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